January 27th, 2020

The No-Campfire Girls cover

99 cents for no campfires, so don't be fussy

This may seem an odd time of the year for this, but I've been working on a novel set at a horse campground in late April, so to me it fits right in. In conjunction with it appearing Monday on the FussyLibrarian website, here's my periodic soap selling about one of my favorite books, The No-Campfire Girls.

Half the proceeds of this novel benefits Friends of Latonka, an organization made to support Emily's former Girl Scout camp in Wappapello, Missouri. That's the camp singer Cheryl Crow went to. No, I'm not making that up.


My fourteen regular readers, you know the story:


Fifteen year old Beth Hamlin is horrified to discover her beloved summer camp must go without campfires this year, due to the fire hazard from a drought. But Beth isn't one to just sit (or swim, or boat, or horseback) around. When her new cabin mate, Cassidy, claims a local Cherokee can do a rain dance, she jumps into action.

All they have to do is trick the Camp Director into letting Running Creek do the dance, avoid the local bully and a flying arrow or two, and keep from getting caught plotting with Cassidy’s firefighter father on a forbidden cell phone. With luck southern Indiana will get a nice, soaking rain, and Camp Inipi can have proper campfires again.

But when things go horribly wrong, the whole area is endangered by a double disaster. Now Beth and her unit may be the only people who can save not only their camp, but everyone in it.
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It was a lot of fun for me to write and seems to be fun to read, judging from the comments. Plus, hey--99 cents for an e-book and five bucks for a print copy is a pretty darned good buy these days.
Like poison ivy, you can get it all over the place. But the most popular place to get it (the book, not poison ivy) is on our website, or on Amazon:
Please consider it for you and/or a young adult you love, because a day without reading is like, well, a day without campfires. Or, best case scenario, reading around a campfire.