Mark Hunter (ozma914) wrote,
Mark Hunter
ozma914

I Missed Fire Prevention, but Fires Go On

 I've barely had a moment free the last several days, and completely forgot that last week was Fire Prevention Week. (A lot of its normal activities, naturally, were curtailed by COVID. Little meanie virus.) So I'm late, and the upcoming week doesn't look all that much better, so I'm partaking in that time honored tradition of reposting a previous blog, or as we called it at the time, newspaper column.

The actual theme of this year's fire prevention week was "Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!" Heaven knows the kitchen can be a pretty dangerous place, especially when I'm using it. Why, just last ... never mind. So be careful in the kitchen, have a fire extinguisher and an escape plan, and when Daylight Savings Time ends in two weeks don't forget to change the batteries on your smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector.

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In my three (or so) decades in the emergency services, (Forty now. I don't want to talk about it.) I never heard anyone complain their smoke detectors worked properly. Well, okay, once—but that guy was an arsonist.
Fire Prevention Week this year is October 9-15, mostly because nothing else goes on in mid-October. No, actually it was because the Great Chicago Fire happened on October 9, 1871. That fire destroyed more than 17,400 structures and killed at least 250 people, and might have been prevented if Mrs. O’Leary had installed a smoke detector in her barn. Have you ever seen a cow remove a smoke detector battery? Me neither.
Nobody really knows what started the Great Chicago Fire, so the dairy industry has a real beef with blaming the cow, which legend says knocked over a lamp. Does the lamp industry ever get the blame? Noooo....
We do know that at about the same time the Peshtigo Fire roared across Wisconsin, killing 1,152 people and burning 16 entire towns. In fact, several fires burned across Michigan and Wisconsin at the time, causing some to speculate a meteor shower may have caused the conflagration. There might have been shooting stars elsewhere, but Chicago got all the press.
This year’s Fire Prevention Week theme is “Don’t wait, check the date!” So ask your date: Does she have a working smoke detector? If not, maybe you should go back to your place.
Just as you should change your smoke detector batteries every fall and spring, you should replace your smoke alarm every ten years. Doing the same to your carbon monoxide detector is a great idea, so it can make a sound to warn about the gas that never makes a sound.
As I hadn’t given much thought to the age of my own smoke detectors, I took that advice. The one in the basement stairway said: “Manufactured 1888 by the Tesla Fire Alarm Co.”
Not a good sign.
The one in the kitchen hallway said simply: “Smoke alarm. Patent pending.”
Oh boy.
So don’t wait—check the date. Do it right now, because otherwise you’d be waiting. I know it doesn’t have quite the pizzazz of the 1942 Fire Prevention Week theme: “Today Every Fire Helps Hitler”.
But hey … you can’t blame the Nazis for everything.


 

Ahem. This would be a good time to remind you that proceeds from our book Smoky Days and Sleepless Nights: A Century or So With the Albion Fire Department go to support, naturally, the Albion Fire Department. You can grab a copy of that or any of our books at the website, http://www.markrhunter.com/books.html, or from the other usual suspects.

 https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B0058CL6OO
https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/"Mark R Hunter" 

 

 

 



Tags: afd, albion fire department, fire department, fire prevention, fire safety, firefighters, smoky days and sleepless nights
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